Thursday, May 29, 2014

Columbia River

Kathi and I Left the Wildhorse Casino on Wednesday morning headed for The Giles French Corps of Engineers Park in Rufus, Oregon. It was only about one hundred miles, but the cross wind made it difficult to stay in my lane in our Alfa motorhome. Wind gusts up to thirty miles per hour. We followed the Lewis and Clark Trail along the Columbia River and spent the night in Rufus, just west of the John Day Dam. To my thinking driving through the Columbia River Gorge is one of the best, most scenic drives in the country. The highway follows the river for a good portion of the trip, as the river curves around the mountains. The mountains range from beautiful rock surfaces, just off the roadway to mountains of forest land. Spectacular.

Across the Columbia River is Washington. It's fun. There is a highway on each side and a railroad track on each side. The trains go through all night long. Personally, I love to hear them, often one on each side going opposite directions. From my RV bedroom window I can watch trucks climb the hill on the Washington side, all night long.

The pictures that follow are in this order. A through the windshield picture of the Columbia River beside the road. A picture of the John Day Dam showing how rough the water was with the wind blowing so much. A night time picture of the river and Washington on the other side from my bedroom window. A double rainbow taken through the windshield in 2013. A picture of the John Day Dam at night. A closer view of the Dam. The two horns sticking up on the left side of the dam guide the lock gate. Tugboats and barges go through the lock, day and night.

A through the windshield picture of the Columbia River beside the road.


A picture of the John Day Dam showing how rough the water was with the wind blowing so much.


A night time picture of the river and Washington on the other side from my bedroom window.


A double rainbow taken through the windshield in 2013.


A picture of the John Day Dam at night.


A closer view of the Dam. The two horns sticking up on the left side of the dam guide the lock gate. Tugboats and barges go through the lock, day and night.

3 comments:

  1. what a beautiful place.

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  2. In the second picture from the top what are the poles jutting out from each pier? D Clark

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  3. The poles are for licensed fishermen. The little piers are hard to get down to because they are off the cliff, but I see people go down there occassionly. About 1/4 mile to the east is a sectioned off area for Native Americans. They are there every day. They are allowed to use nets and there is no limits to the number of fish they can catch.

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